26 Favorite Shrimp Recipes

Enjoy our favorite shrimp recipes, plus cooking tips, fun facts, and everything you never knew about shrimp.

Shrimp Boil

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Shrimp Boil

A shrimp boil makes a great portable meal for the backyard—or the beach! Finish off the meal with our perfect picnic brownies or one of our delectable summer desserts.

Recipe: Shrimp Boil

Shrimp with Zesty Cocktail Sauce

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Shrimp with Zesty Cocktail Sauce

Spice up store-bought cocktail sauce with a simple variation. Add 1 tablespoon each chopped fresh dill and chopped preserved lemon (or 1 teaspoon lemon zest) to one 12-ounce bottle of Heinz Original Cocktail Sauce (or your favorite brand).

Recipe: Shrimp with Zesty Cocktail Sauce

Shrimp Ceviche

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Shrimp Ceviche

The secret to this fresh, summer dish is to let the ingredients chill for several hours so the flavors will mix.

Recipe: Shrimp Ceviche

Hot-and-Sour Soup

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Hot-and-Sour Soup

Ninety percent of shrimp eaten in the U.S. are imported (7% from Gulf and 3% from Atlantic and Pacific oceans).Thailand is the U.S.’s largest importer of shrimp and other major players include Indonesia, Ecuador, China, and Vietnam.

Recipe: Hot-and-Sour Soup

Honey Shrimp Skewers

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Honey Shrimp Skewers

Did you know that Gulf shrimp accounts for most of the wild shrimp eaten in the U.S.? The recent oil spill in the Gulf has renewed a lot of questions about safety and right now Gulf seafood is the most watched and regulated in the world.

Recipe: Honey Shrimp Skewers

Grilled Shrimp Panzanella Salad

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Grilled Shrimp Panzanella Salad

Look for I.Q.F. on the label for the freshest shrimp on the market. It means “individually quick frozen,” and tit's easier to manage than 5-pound frozen bulk blocks. Once thawed, frozen shrimp is just as perishable as fresh so make sure you are buying recently thawed seafood. Or, buy them I.Q.F. frozen.

Recipe: Grilled Shrimp Panzanella Salad

grilled shrimp kebabs

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Grilled Shrimp Kebabs

Fact: More than 80 percent of the shrimp sold in America is imported. Most of the local-versus-imported debate focuses on environmental and health concerns. Many countries allow coastal deforestation and United States-banned antibiotics. To ensure you buy chemical-free shrimp, ask your fishmonger for wild American shrimp.

Recipe: Grilled Shrimp Kebabs

Cheesy Shrimp and grits

Howard L. Puckett

Cheesy Shrimp and Grits

Fact: Shrimp accounts for about 25 percent of all seafood sold in the United States, making it the best-selling creature of the water.


 Recipe: Cheesy Shrimp and Grits
 

Grilled Shrimp and Asian Barbecue Sauce

Jean Allsopp

Grilled Shrimp and Asian Barbecue Sauce

Fact: Shrimp not only tastes great, but it’s also waistline friendly―a 6-ounce portion has only 180 calories and 3 grams of fat. Plus, it’s versatile and easy to prepare. You don’t have to be a trained chef to get a wonderful shrimp dinner on the table in 10 minutes.

Recipe: Grilled Shrimp and Asian Barbecue Sauce

Fresh Gulf Shrimp in Barbecue Butter

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Fresh Gulf Shrimp in Barbecue Butter

Fact: Almost all shrimp you buy is frozen at sea or shortly thereafter. More than likely, “fresh” shrimp is actually thawed. Truly fresh shrimp appears more translucent than thawed shrimp, and its highly perishable nature makes it rarely available. The United States imports 80 to 90 percent of the shrimp its residents consume, so it stands to reason that the product is shipped frozen.

Recipe: Fresh Gulf Shrimp in Barbecue Butter

Coconut Shrimp with Maui Mustard

Howard L. Puckett

Coconut Shrimp with Maui Mustard

Cooking Tip: When buying any seafood, use your nose. Shrimp should smell mildly of the sea, but not like iodine, ammonia, or low tide.

Recipe: Coconut Shrimp with Maui Mustard


Flying Trapeze Shrimp

Blake Pearson

Flying Trapeze Shrimp

Fact: Hundreds of shrimp species swim in the seas, and some have minute differences we would never notice on our plates. Warm-water shrimp grow larger, but tend to taste less sweet than their cold-water cousins. Freshwater shrimp are usually farm-raised and prized for their size. Regardless of raw shrimp's color, which can range from white to yellow to brown to striped, all shrimp turn pink when cooked.

Recipe: Flying Trapeze Shrimp

Shrimp and Brie Linguine

Howard L. Puckett

Shrimp and Brie Linguine

Fact: The terms used to describe shrimp size―small, medium, large, jumbo, colossal―mean different things in different locations, and the jargon has no industry regulations. The more universal technique measures shrimp by the count, or number. If the shrimp are “16-20s,” that means there are 16 to 20 shrimp per pound, regardless of the label’s large, extra-large, or jumbo designation.

Recipe: Shrimp and Brie Linguine

Cornmeal-Cumin-Crusted Shrimp

Howard L. Puckett

Cornmeal-Cumin-Crusted Shrimp

Tip: Large shrimp are fairly easy to devein. Simply slit the back with a paring knife and lift the vein out with the knife point. But don't feel you have to devein. If you can't see the vein when the shrimp is raw, chances are you won't when it's cooked. Similarly, smaller shrimp have smaller veins, often not visible. Deveining comes down to aesthetics, not hygiene. If the veins don't show, don't bother.

Recipe: Cornmeal-Cumin-crusted Shrimp with Red Pepper-Chiplote Dipping Sauce

key-lime-grilled-shrimp-recipe

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Key Lime Grilled Shrimp

Cooking Tip: Shrimp cook quickly, which makes them easy to overcook. Prepare them just until they no longer look translucent and they will taste crisp and tender and moist. Keep an eye on them; most shrimp cook fully in less than five minutes.

Recipe: Key Lime Grilled Shrimp

Curry-Mango Shrimp

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Curry-Mango Shrimp

Cooking Tip: Experiment with shrimp steamed, boiled, sautéed, or fried. You can serve it shell and tail on, shell off and tail on, or shell and tail removed. When paired with a sauce, serve shrimp peeled and remove the tail. For finger food, leave the tail intact, as it makes a convenient "handle."

Recipe: Curry-Mango Shrimp

Shrimp Seviche with Mango and Habanero

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Shrimp Seviche with Mango and Habanero

Fact: Unlike most other foods, shrimp are identified by size. Because the meaning of the term “large” varies, you’ll often find shrimp labeled by number per pound. For example, “26–30” means there are 26 to 30 shrimp, totaling one pound of seafood.

Recipe: Shrimp Seviche with mango and Habenero

Bacon-wrapped Shrimp with Basil-Garlic Stuffing

Howard L. Puckett

Bacon-wrapped Shrimp with Basil-Garlic Stuffing

Fact: Peeling and deveining shrimp (often called P&D) removed about half the weight, so a 26–30 P&D shrimp is larger than a 26–30 unpeeled. As a general rule, use small or medium shrimp in salads, fillings, and stir-fries, and large ones for kebabs and peel-and-eat meals.

Recipe: Bacon-wrapped Shrimp with Basil-Garlic Stuffing

Shrimp, Tomato, and Watermelon Salad

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Shrimp, Tomato, and Watermelon Salad

Fact: On average one shrimp has 10 legs.

Recipe: Shrimp, Tomato, and Watermelon Salad

Coconut Shrimp and Rice Pilaf

Jean Allsopp

Coconut Shrimp and Rice Pilaf

Fact: "Green" is the name for raw, uncooked shrimp.

Recipe: Coconut Shrimp and Rice Pilaf

Honey-glazed Shrimp

Jean Allsopp

Honey-glazed Shrimp

Fact: 50% is the size of a shrimp's head in comparison to its body

Recipe: Honey-glazed Shrimp

Grilled Lime Scampi

Jean Allsopp

Grilled Lime Scampi

Cooking Tip: Scampi is a style of shrimp that has been broiled or sautéed, usually in butter and garlic

Recipe: Grilled Lime Scampi

Tropical Fruit, Avocado, and Grilled Shrimp Salad

Tropical Fruit, Avocado, and Grilled Shrimp Salad

Fact: Americans consume 1 billion pounds of shrimpevery year.

Recipe: Tropical Fruit, Avocado, and Grilled Shrimp Salad

grilled-shrimp-with-sangrita-recipe

France Ruffenach

Grilled Shrimp with Sangrita

Cooking Tip: Here is a good estimate on buying shrimp for 6 people (about 2 pounds): 24 jumbo fresh shrimp (or) 30 large fresh shrimp. If buying for 4, about 1-1/2 pounds.

Recipe: Grilled Shrimp with Sangrita

vietnamese-style-prawns-and-hearts-of-palm-with-green-tea-noodle-salad-recipe

Photographer Jean Allsop

Vietnamese-style Prawns and Hearts of Palm with Green Tea-Noodle Salad

Fact: Whether boiled, fried, sautéed, or grilled, America’s favorite crustacean, shrimp, makes the mouth water and the mind wander to a coastal locale. Discovered accidentally in a fishing net, this finger-length crustacean was dubbed schrimpe, the Middle English word for “small, puny person.” Shrimp have long since become a staple in the culinary world, with versatile recipes for almost every palate.

Recipe: Vietnamese-Style Prawns and Hearts of Palm with Green Tea Noodle Salad

Grilled Shrimp Gazpacho

Becky Luigart-Stayner

Grilled Shrimp Gazpacho

Cooking Tip: When buying shrimp, you should consider several factors. Fresh versus frozen is perhaps the most obvious. Keep in mind that shrimp spoils quickly, and freezing helps maintain quality. Another consideration is where the shrimp come from. Recently enacted country of origin labeling stipulates that seafood must be clearly marked with location of harvest.

Recipe: Grilled Shrimp Gazpacho

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