Asian-Inspired Flavors

Forget takeout—we've got a lineup of some of the best Asian-Inspired recipes with tasty ingredients you can easily find at your local grocery store.

Shrimp Ceviche

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Shrimp Ceviche

Ceviche is traditionally a serving of raw fish that has been marinated in citrus juice and spices. However, this recipe calls for cooked, chilled shrimp. The olive oil and cucumber work together to temper the acidity of the pickled jalapeño chiles and lime juice in this crisp, refreshing dish.

Grilled Chinese Sweet and Sour Pork Kabobs

Photo: Con Poulos

Grilled Chinese Sweet and Sour Pork Kabobs

Sweet and Sour sauce is a hallmark of Chinese cuisine—and for good reason. This recipe uses ketchup, pineapple, and Worcestershire to deliver the perfect flavor profile for pork kabobs. Don’t forget to add some freshly sliced onion and bell pepper to the skewers before hitting the grill.

Orange-Sesame Noodles with Grilled Shrimp

Photo: Jean Allsopp

Orange-Sesame Noodles with Grilled Shrimp

Asian noodles come from various sources—from mung bean to yams. The noodles in this recipe are made from buckwheat, which must be boiled longer than other Asian noodles. Once the noodles are done cooking, serve this dish immediately for a zesty entreé, or chill for a refreshing salad.

Fried Snapper with Nuoc Nam Sauce

Photo: Beck Luigart-Stayner

Fried Snapper with Nuoc Nam Sauce

Nuoc Nam sauce is a sweet fish sauce with lime juice and jalapeño. After frying the fish, serve over cooked rice, Nuoc Nam, mango and jalapeño for a slightly hot, slightly sweet, and delicious entrée.

Grilled Shrimp with Asian Barbecue Sauce

Photo: Jean Allsopp

Grilled Shrimp with Asian Barbecue Sauce

This barbecue sauce gets its powerful flavor from ginger and jalapeño. When blended with vinegar, tomato paste, sesame oil, and soy sauce this sauce gives grilled shrimp a hearty kick with a medley of delicious flavors.

Whole-Roasted Trout with Asian Pear-Fig Chutney

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Whole-Roasted Trout with Asian Pear-Fig Chutney

Roasting fish whole helps the meat retain moisture and flavor. Tip: When picking out a whole fish at the market, choose one with eyes that are clear, bright, and bulging. When roasting, you can tell your fish is done when the eyes have turned white and the flesh flakes easily with a fork.

Simple Nori Rolls

Photo: Jean Allsopp

Simple Nori Rolls

Nori is the edible seaweed that encompasses the rest of the sushi elements. These rolls can be made with a number of different ingredients including sliced avocado, cucumber strips, julienned carrots, cooked shrimp, and teriyaki beef strips. Serve with soy sauce, wasabi paste, and pickled ginger on the side.

Tempura Soft-Shell Crab with Asian Slaw

Photo: Jean Allsopp

Tempura Soft-Shell Crab with Asian Slaw

Soft-shell crab refers to crabs caught when they begin shedding their hard outer shells to grow larger ones. This stage lasts a short period of time, which makes soft-shell crabs an elusive delicacy. Soft-shell crabs have stored up fat for the molting period, which helps deliver a rich and savory flavor.

Thai Coconut Soup

Photo: Becky Luigart Stayner

Thai Coconut Soup

This is a delicious rendition of the Tom Ka Gai you can find in your favorite Thai restaurant. If you have trouble finding lemon grass and kaffir lime leaves don’t worry; just substitute a teaspoon of lime zest. If you prefer a milder soup, seed the chiles before adding them.

Vietnamese Flank Steak

Photo: David Hillegas

Vietnamese Flank Steak

Because flank steak is a thin cut of meat, it will take less time to cook. Keep an eye on the meat to avoid accidentally overcooking it. This recipe calls for a seven-minute grill time, but it can vary depending on your desired doneness.

Coconut Curried Shrimp

Coconut Curried Shrimp

Sweet and spicy shrimp star in this recipe that’s filled with traditional Thai flavors, including coconut milk, curry spice, and red curry paste. You can serve the dish with or without the shrimp tails according to your preference, but the tails serve as a great natural handle when using your fingers to eat.

Beef Tenderloin Yakitori

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Beef Tenderloin Yakitori

This recipe calls for beef tenderloin, but for a bargain-friendly version, pick more affordable cuts of beef like chuck round or flank, and weave thin strips onto each skewer.

Salmon Carpaccio with Wasabi

Salmon Carpaccio with Wasabi

Carpaccio is an Italian dish of raw meat or fish that is either thinly sliced or pounded flat. This Asian twist on the recipe calls for thinly sliced king salmon with wasabi and hot sesame oil— not for the faint of heart.

Sesame-Soy Salmon

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Sesame-Soy Salmon

Sweet and salty flavors highlight this rich salmon entreé. Serve over rice noodles with sautéed shiitake mushrooms and snow peas. But be cautious when boiling rice noodles, as they can overcook and become mushy much quicker than standard wheat-based noodles.

Bite Size Wasabi Crab Cakes

Photo: Howard L. Puckett

Bite Size Wasabi Crab Cakes

Topped with a fresh ginger aioli, these appetizer mini-cakes will be a major crowd pleaser. The crab cake mixture can be made several hours ahead. After they’re cooked, you can keep them warm in a 200° oven for up to an hour.

Hot and Sour Soup with Salmon and Oyster Mushrooms

Photo: Leo Gong

Hot and Sour Soup with Salmon and Oyster Mushrooms

Tender chunks of salmon and delicate mushrooms mellow this tangy, peppery soup. If the soup is too spicy for you once it has been simmered, just add a pinch of sugar to the stock.

Ginger-Soy Glazed Mahi Mahi

Photo: Jean Allsopp

Ginger-Soy Glazed Mahi Mahi

This Hawaiian dish is a favorite at traditional family gatherings, but can easily be replicated in your own kitchen. The fish’s name, mahi-mahi, means very strong in Hawaiian but the taste is quite the opposite as mahi-mahi is notable for not being a very “fishy” tasting fish.

Asian Fried Crab Balls

Photo: France Ruffenach

Asian Fried Crab Balls

These fried crab balls get their kick from ginger and garlic. Once fried, roll balls in sesame seeds and serve over daikon radish, enoki mushrooms, and radish sprouts. Pour the savory broth over crab balls and top with strips of nori for an impressive presentation.

Grilled Shrimp in a Banana-leaf Pouch

Photo: Jean Allsopp

Grilled Shrimp in a Banana-leaf Pouch

When choosing banana leaves, make sure they are pliable greens with no signs of browning. If the leaves are too rigid, dip them in boiling water for a few seconds to soften them up. If banana leaves are unavailable, use two layers of aluminum foil and reduce the cooking time to 5-7 minutes.

Ahi Tuna Sevichi with Mango and Avocado

Photo: France Ruffenach 

Ahi Tuna Sevichi with Mango and Avocado

When shopping for fish, be sure to buy sushi-grade tuna as it will be served raw. Ask your local fishmonger for the freshest sushi-grade tuna available to ensure the quality of taste and reduce the risk of food-borne illness. This dish will pair perfectly with an aromatic Sauvignon Blanc.

Sesame Crusted Tuna with Teriyaki Stir-Fry

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Sesame Crusted Tuna with Teriyaki Stir-Fry

The amount of time the tuna is seared will determine the rareness or doneness of the meat. For a rare piece cook 1 minute per side and for medium rare cook 3 minutes. Most ahi tuna is sushi-grade, which means it’s perfectly okay to eat raw.

Hot and Sour Soup

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Hot and Sour Soup

This soup recipe calls for bamboo shoots, which pair wonderfully with most Asian dishes. However, the bamboo shoot has an extremely bitter taste when eaten raw. They must be thinly sliced and boiled several times before becoming edible. Luckily, any culinary bamboo will usually come canned and pre-boiled for you.

Chicken Yakitori

Photo: David Hillegas

Chicken Yakitori

Yakitori is a traditional Japanese term for chicken that is skewered and grilled. This recipe is a user-friendly replication of this popular Japanese street food. You can use either chicken thighs or breasts for this recipe depending on your preference.

Miso-Glazed Black Cod in Coconut Broth

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Miso-Glazed Black Cod in Coconut Broth

Miso is a Japanese seasoning made with soybeans, barley, or rice combined with salt and koji-kin, a fungus that acts as a fermenting agent. In this recipe, the glaze is made from yellow or white miso with sweet rice wine, sugar, and lime juice.

Hoisin-Glazed Wild Alaska Salmon in Ginger Broth

Photo: Becky Luigart-Stayner

Hoisin-Glazed Wild Alaska Salmon in Ginger Broth

Hoisin is a Chinese sauce traditionally made with toasted and mashed soybeans. Fondly described as the Chinese equivalent to American barbecue sauce, it can be used as a flavorful glaze for meats—like in this recipe—or just as a condiment.

Basil, Chicken, and Veggies in Coconut-Curry Sauce

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Basil, Chicken, and Veggies in Coconut-Curry Sauce

Woks cook ingredients very quickly over high heat. To ensure that all of your elements cook properly, make sure to chop veggies and meat uniformly before you start cooking, and add meat to the wok in one layer to get an even sear.

Garlic-Pork Stir-Fry

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Garlic-Pork Stir-Fry

To prevent painful oil splatters, thoroughly drain the pork marinade before adding meat to the wok. Make sure you use either vegetable oil or specially marked stir-fry oil. They each have a high smoke point, so they won't burn over high heat and ruin your meat.

Shrimp-Pineapple Fried Rice

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Shrimp-Pineapple Fried Rice

This dish gets its unique flavor from pineapple seared quickly in the wok prior to combining with the cooked shrimp. Make sure you preheat your wok before stir-friyng. You'll know the wok is ready when a drop of water evaporates in 1 or 2 seconds after hitting the metal.

Mongolian Beef

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Mongolian Beef

Tossing your steaks in cornstarch before cooking gives the meat a great crispiness. Combined with fried noodles and onion, this dish delivers a perfectly satisfying crunch.

Pad Thai

Photo: Jennifer Davick

Pad Thai

This recipe calls for tamarind paste, which adds bright, sour flavor to the iconic Thai noodle dish. If you can't get your hands on tamarind paste, we suggest substituting fresh lemon or lime juice instead.

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