Rescued from Ruin

A Georgia couple scraps new construction plans in favor of restoring a sinking marshfront cottage once owned by auto magnate Henry Ford.

Cottage Exterior Before

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Exterior Before

The tiny farm manager's cottage, one of only four original structures from Henry Ford's 1930s plantation, sat in a low, wet area and was used for storage before the Morgans saved it.

Cottage Exterior After

Photo: Deborah Whitllaw Llwellyn

Cottage Exterior After

Charmed by the home's history, cozy size, and unusual combination of board-and-batten siding plus tiled roof, the Morgans renovated the house after relocating it to higher ground (atop brick piers) with expansive marsh views.

Living Room Before

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Living Room Before

Rotten window frames and peeling paint made the house look sad and gloomy.

Living Room After

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Living Room After

The stripped original poplar tongue-and-groove boards, heart pine flooring sealed with a clear polyurethane, and beeswax-polished pine mantel lend a warm, welcoming glow. The off-white trim is a crisp touch.

Kitchen Before

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Kitchen Before

The kitchen was dated and dingy, with Formica countertops, low ceilings, and mouse-infested cabinetry.

Kitchen After

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Kitchen After

Reclaimed heart pine counters, open shelves, and a vaulted ceiling exude vintage charm. Vanita found the 1952 double drainboard sink at a Georgia roadside antiques stand.

Dining Room

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Dining Room

In the dining room, French doors open to a new screened porch with water views, replacing three small windows and a wood stove that heated the cottage before central heat was installed.

Bathroom Before

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Bathroom Before

The cramped master bath was full of rotten and dilapidated fixtures.

Bathroom After

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Bathroom After

Vaulting the ceilings and lengthening the room by three feet gives a light, airy feel; the claw-foot tub lends old-school appeal.

Guest Room

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Guest Room

The Morgans swapped out a window to create a doorway leading to the new 6- by 8-foot guest bath.

Screened Porch

Photo: Deborah Whitlaw Llwellyn

Screened Porch

The new 264-square-foot screened porch added extra dining space (read: the kids' table!) and a sitting area that helps the cottage live larger when extended family visits.

Printed from:
http://www.coastalliving.com/homes/decorating/georgia-cottage-makeover-00414000068869/