April 2012

The April 2012 issue of Coastal Living magazine is all about getting set for summer. You'll find 20 ways to get your porch or patio ready for the season, and tips for holding a perfect tag sale when that Spring-cleaning bug hits. We have 10 mouth-watering low country recipes from Charleston chef Frank McMahon, and five tempting ways to serve tuna. Plus, chef, author, and TV personality Giada De Laurentiis lets us take a peek inside her beach bag, and shares her favorite summer snack.

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April 2012 Online Features

Find links to features promoted in our April 2012 issue.

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  • Web Exclusive

    26 Beachy Porches and Patios

    Find your own outdoor inspiration from our favorite relaxing retreats.

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  • Web Exclusive

    Our Top 25 House Plans

    From bungalows built for two to spacious beachside retreats, we’ve gathered your all-time favorite house plans. Now, who’s ready to build?

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  • Coastal Home

    Secrets to a Terrific Tag Sale

    Got clutter? It really can be someone else's treasure. Here's how to make your sale a success.

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  • Coastal Home

    Go Out Swinging

    Our motto: Never waste a view. Here's how to create a dreamy porch that's all about taking in the scenery and feeling the breeze

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  • Coastal Kitchen

    The Lure of Tuna

    From a luxury bluefin to the ol' standby in a pop-top can, this is one popular fish. Here's the ocean-to-table skinny on tuna—including eight incredible recipes to serve it up oh-so-right.

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  • Coastal Kitchen

    A Taste of Charleston

    Whip up a tempting seafood dish from Hank's Seafood Restaurant, a notable South Carolina staple.

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