Victor Lamas Sanchez/Courtesy PEZO VON ELLRICHSHAUSEN

At 750 square feet, the structure is “more than a hut but less than a house: it is a cottage,” say the architects. And it’s definitely unlike any tiny beach cottage we’ve ever seen.

By Marisa Spyker

The steep grade of a beachside cliff might seem like a treacherous spot to build a beach house; but, when the architects behind Chilean firm Pezo von Ellrichshausen found this location, they saw it as an opportunity to build something unlike anything else.

Meet the Loba House—a tall, narrow, monolithic concrete structure in Chile that extends out from a Pacific Ocean-facing slope like a ledge growing out of the hillside. A flat concrete roof extends horizontally from the cliff, while the bottom of the home slopes upward, creating a triangular façade.

Victor Lamas Sanchez/Courtesy PEZO VON ELLRICHSHAUSEN
Courtesy PEZO VON ELLRICHSHAUSEN

Inside, the floors follow the natural shape of the terrain, with a series of six stepped platforms that divide the home into living and sleeping spaces. Three large concrete columns housing things like the hearth and bath separate the wide-open, one-room structure.  Circular skylights and strategically placed windows make sure the all-concrete interiors get plenty of natural light and access to those five-star views.

Related: Explore This Glass House's Amazing Clifftop Location By Drone: 

Courtesy PEZO VON ELLRICHSHAUSEN

If one really wants to take in those South American sunsets, however, they’re best enjoyed from the roof, which doubles as a terrace and is accessible from the inside via a ladder. During the day, the prime site also enjoys views of the neighboring sea lion reserve.

Now that sounds pretty wild and dreamy to us. While the unique home isn't for sale, we can all admire it from afar. See more photos of this contemporary concrete escape here:

Victor Lamas Sanchez/Courtesy PEZO VON ELLRICHSHAUSEN
Courtesy PEZO VON ELLRICHSHAUSEN
Victor Lamas Sanchez/Courtesy PEZO VON ELLRICHSHAUSEN