Douglas Elliman

Views like these spark Pulitzer Prize-worthy prose.

By Marisa Spyker

There’s something about the sea that’s long attracted creatives, from artists and musicians to poets and playwrights. (Even Shakespeare had 200 mentions of the ocean in his works.)

So it doesn’t come as a surprise that artists and writers often turn to the coast when house shopping. For playwright Edward Albee—who famously penned the world-renowned Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolf?—his search took him to this shingle-style Montauk hideaway set on 2.8 acres.

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Albee, who owned the Hamptons charmer until his passing in 2016, was convinced by stage actress Uta Hagen to purchase the home in the 1960s. It’s since been used by the Edward Albee Foundation to host artist and writer residency programs. Now, for the first time in more than 50 years, Albee’s escape is on the market for $20 million, with proceeds benefiting the foundation.

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Set on 200 feet of ocean frontage, the compound comprises a 2,100-square-foot cedar-shingle main house, an 817-square-foot guest cottage, a pool, pool house, and tennis court. The stunning ocean views, coupled with the property’s secluded feel and landscape lush with greenery, make the gem a magnet for creatives—not just for Albee, but also for notable guests such as Tennessee Williams and artist Lee Krasner.

Related: Plan the Perfect Weekend in the Hamptons:

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Inside the main house, ocean views are showcased from nearly every room, including the second-floor study, where Albee is said to have written many of his notable plays, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Seascape.

Now that’s a legacy worth bragging about, whether you’re an artist yourself or simply an enthusiast. See more of this Hamptons hideaway below:

Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman