Courtesy of Douglas Elliman

The quirky tiny home served as a Long Island escape for the Hollywood bombshell in the ‘50s.

By Marisa Spyker

Long before the Hamptons became a celeb-filled summer playground, it was an agricultural hub fueled in part by a crop of windmills that began popping up in the early 1800s.

Though most of them ceased to operate by the turn of the century, they remain an iconic symbol of the island’s past. And for a lucky few, they also make for a storybook spot to live or vacation.

Courtesy of Douglas Elliman

One such windmill-turned-cottage is this 1,100-square-foot charmer in Amagansett. Built in 1830, the windmill was operational until the ‘50s, when it was converted into a guest house by the founder of Faberge Perfumes, according to Curbed. Since then, it’s had many notable guests—most famously, perhaps, Marilyn Monroe and then-husband Arthur Miller, who rented the cottage in 1957. (Other notable tenants include Kurt Vonnegut and actor Terrence Stamp.)

Related: Plan the Perfect Weekend in the Hamptons:

Courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Inside, the newly renovated guest house has two bedrooms and one bath spread between its three floors. Guests enter through the windmill portion of the home, where the living room occupies the bottom floor and leads into a compact kitchen. Outside, there’s a paved patio with a dining table where evening meals would be divine, but guests can also explore the windmill’s entire five-acre lot, along with the nearby Amagansett National Wildlife Refuge and Atlantic Avenue Beach. 

Courtesy of Douglas Elliman

If you have the (seven-year) itch to stay here like Marilyn did, you’re in luck: the windmill owners are looking for new tenants to call this place their vacation home, with rates going for $55,000 for the summer or $68,000 year-round. And you might want to run like the wind to snag it; we have a feeling this famously charming cottage will be scooped up fast.

Courtesy of Douglas Elliman
Courtesy of Douglas Elliman
Courtesy of Douglas Elliman
Courtesy of Douglas Elliman