The jukebox favorite hung his hat (and cardigan sweaters) here for much of his singing career.

By Marisa Spyker
Courtesy Douglas Elliman

If you think back to the ‘50s and ‘60s, you’ll likely remember a time when the nation collectively tuned their TVs to a particular syrupy voiced barber-turned-baritone named Perry Como. The legendary singer’s eponymous show and spinoff holiday specials earned the star five Emmys and a slew of fans for decades.

But after the Pennsylvania-bred singer wowed his devotees on television, he returned to the setting that appears to have wowed him most: the beach. Since striking fame in the ‘40s, Como apparently played house a stone’s throw from the shore, first in a two-and-a-half-acre Long Island estate followed by the Jupiter Island, Florida, house he occupied until his death in 2001.

Related: This Seashell House Is the Ultimate Beachcomber's Fantasy: 

Courtesy Douglas Elliman

His former pad is now up for grabs and, fortunately for Como’s most diehard fans, there are still quite a few marks left behind by the famed vocalist. According to Realtor.com, Como purchased the six-bedroom Colonial-style house in 1946, nine years after it was first built. The then-film and music star proceeded to put his own touches on the two-and-a-half-acre estate by the sea, including a circular 15-car driveway, a spacious great room with beamed ceilings, and an LA-style pool and cabana. The most salient reminder of Como’s ownership, however, is in the powder room, where a hand-painted caricature of the legendary singer along with the words “Ladies will please stay seated during the entire performance” decorates a wall. “It has a very Old Hollywood feel,” listing agent Jill Berman told Realtor.com.

Courtesy Douglas Elliman
Courtesy Douglas Elliman

But Como connections aside, the two-and-a-half-acre estate-like residence has other perks, too. Perched on a covetable piece of land (beach rights included) in the Sands Point community, the home is surrounded by greenery on all sides for the ultimate in privacy. In addition to its six bedrooms and Como-added great room, the house boasts a chef’s kitchen, grand formal dining room, wood-paneled library, and loads of hardscaped outdoor entertaining space.

Ready to move in? The Colonial hideaway on Long Island is listed by its current artist owner for $2.9 million—a deal compared to its original listing price of $3.95 million. See more photos of Perry Como’s one-time beach escape here:

Courtesy Douglas Elliman
Courtesy Douglas Elliman
Courtesy Douglas Elliman
Courtesy Douglas Elliman
Courtesy Douglas Elliman
Advertisement