Courtesy of Flamingo Gardens

This could be the cutest thing we’ve seen all year!

By Marisa Spyker

There’s a new addition to the pack at South Florida’s Flamingo Gardens—and it’s causing quite the stir on social media.

A teacup-sized baby flamingo hatched from its shell on August 1 and has since been melting hearts as it learns the ins and outs of flamingo-ing, from swimming and walking to, yes, even standing on one leg.

Hangin’ with the peeps!

Posted by Flamingo Gardens on Tuesday, August 21, 2018

The flamingo chick is the first-ever to be born at the Fort Lauderdale-area nonprofit sanctuary, which is home to permanently injured and rescued Florida native wildlife, including 19 adult flamingoes. (According to Flamingo Gardens, the iconic pink birds rarely breed when the flock has less than 20 in it, or if gender ratios are skewed.)

Courtesy of Flamingo Gardens

Since entering the world, the baby chick—currently being called Baby Jane until a gender is determined—has had quite the eventful month. In her first week, she began walking, swimming, feeding on seafood, and practicing her soon-to-be signature one-legged stance. All of this is under the supervision of Flamingo Gardens’ Wildlife Curator, Laura Wyatt, who’s raising the chick behind the scenes until she’s healthy enough to join the rest of the flock.

Until then, the chick is being brought out to mingle with its fellow flamingoes and visit the public once a day for a short period of time. And, lucky for those of us who can’t be there, the organization is sharing all the cuteness on its Facebook page:

Baby Flamingo Fist Steps

Like any toddler, our baby flamingo stumbles as it takes its first steps, but keeps on going. Cutest baby bird ever!

Posted by Flamingo Gardens on Thursday, August 9, 2018
Posted by Flamingo Gardens on Sunday, August 19, 2018

Posted by Flamingo Gardens on Thursday, August 23, 2018
Posted by Flamingo Gardens on Thursday, August 23, 2018

That face! Those chirps! * Swoon * Anyone else want to adopt one of these right now?

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